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70-Year-Old Woman Daljinder Kaur Gives Birth To First Baby

Daljinder Kaur and her husband, 79, had Arman last month after two years of IVF treatment at a fertility clinic in Haryana

 Mohinder Singh Gill and his wife, Daljinder Kaur, with their son Arman in Amritsar. Photograph: Barcroft Images

Mohinder Singh Gill and his wife, Daljinder Kaur, with their son Arman in Amritsar. Photograph: Barcroft Images

Daljinder Kaur gave birth to a boy after two years of IVF treatment.The baby weighed 2 kilograms and was declared ‘healthy and hearty’. Daljinder Kaur who gave birth at the age of 70 said Tuesday she was not too old to become a first-time mother, adding that her life was now complete.Daljinder Kaur gave birth last month to a boy following two years of IVF treatment at a fertility clinic in the northern state of Haryana with her 79-year-old husband.

Kaur said the couple, married for 46 years, had almost lost hope of ever having a child.

“God heard our prayers. My life feels complete now. I am looking after the baby all by myself, I feel so full of energy. My husband is also very caring and helps me as much as he can,” Kaur said from Amritsar.

“When we saw the (IVF) advert, we thought we should also give it a try as I badly wanted to have a baby of my own,” she said.

Kaur put her age at about 70, a common scenario in India where many people don’t have birth certificates, while the clinic said in a statement that she was 72.




The baby was conceived using the couple’s own egg and sperm and was now “healthy and hearty” after weighing just two kilogrammes (4.4 pounds) at birth on April 19, the National Fertility and Test Tube centre said.

Kaur’s husband, Mohinder Singh Gill, who owns a farm outside Amritsar, said he was unfazed about their age, saying God would watch over their child whom they named Armaan.”People say what will happen to the child once we die. But I have full faith in God. God is omnipotent and omnipresent, he will take care of everything,” he said.Anurag Bishnoi, who runs the fertility clinic, said he was initially sceptical about going ahead with in vitro fertilisation (IVF), but tests showed Kaur was able to carry the unborn baby.”I first tried to avoid the case because she looked very frail. Then we made her undergo all the tests and once all the results were okay we went ahead,” the doctor said.

 

“They were donor eggs. She had two attempts and then a gap of six months. And then on the third attempt, it was successful.

“For them it is a time of great happiness. Especially because her brother, also, didn’t have any children. They were two families, and both didn’t have children. In Indian law they don’t allow adoption after 45 years of age.”

He said he recognised that some people may consider IVF in older women unethical. “My point is if you put a restriction [on receiving IVF treatment] of 45 or 50 years, you will have to put a restriction on the males also. If they are talking about ethics, the [age] should be the same for both.”

As to how the couple would cope, he said: “They have relatives who are ready to help take care of the baby. And you can make anyone a guardian.”

Gill told AFP he was unfazed by their age. “People say, what will happen to the child once we die. But I have full faith in God. God is omnipotent and omnipresent, he will take care of everything.”




 Source – theguardian , punjaboutlook